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4 Best Books That Will Help You Find Yourself – 2020 Guide

by Isabel Updegraff

Finding yourself has become an umbrella term for many life situations that we are uncomfortable with. Many experts, David Hoffmeister included, believe that most of those situations are in our heads. Since they are there, we have the power to change them and create new, more pleasant surroundings. That is the aim of many of the books on our list. By changing the way we think and do things, we can affect our mental well-being in a positive way. Of course, getting there is a completely different matter and all of us can sue some help along the way. This is where these books step in. Authors are experts who possess a vast amount of insight into the subjects they are writing about and we can all benefit from their advice. So, without further ado, here is our list of 4 best books that will help you find yourself.

4. The Power of Habit

img source: medium.com

Written by: Charles Duhigg

Habits can be a powerful force in our lives and learning how they originate and how we can exploit them can be very valuable. Charles Duhigg, a Pulitzer prize winner, goes into details of the science behind habits and presents it in an interesting way anyone can understand.

Reviews:

“Sharp, provocative, and useful.”—Jim Collins

“Few [books] become essential manuals for business and living. The Power of Habit is an exception. Charles Duhigg not only explains how habits are formed but how to kick bad ones and hang on to the good.”—Financial Times

“Entertaining . . . enjoyable . . . fascinating . . . a serious look at the science of habit formation and change.”—The New York Times Book Review

“Cue: see the cover. Routine: read the book. Reward: fully comprehend the art of manipulation.”—Bloomberg Businessweek

“A fresh examination of how routine behaviors take hold and whether they are susceptible to change . . . The stories that Duhigg has knitted together are all fascinating in their own right, but take on an added dimension when wedded to his examination of habits.”— Associated Press

“There’s been a lot of research over the past several years about how our habits shape us, and this work is beautifully described in the new book The Power of Habit.”—David Brooks, The New York Times

3. Braving The Wilderness: The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone

img source: brenebrown.com

Written by: Brené Brown

The modern world we live in is often so polarized that simply stating your opinion can land you in hot water. It is becoming increasingly difficult to deal with the pressure of having an opinion, especially if that opinion is not in the majority. Brené Brown teaches us that it is OK to be yourself and hot to find the courage to do so, despite the reactions of the people around us.

Reviews:

“[Brown’s] research and work have given us a new vocabulary, a way to talk with each other about the ideas and feelings and fears we’ve all had but haven’t quite known how to articulate. . . . [She] empowers us each to be a little more courageous.”—The Huffington Post

“It is inevitable—we will fall. We will fail. We will not know how to react or what to do. No matter how or when it happens, we will all have a choice—do we get up or not? Thankfully, Brené Brown is there with an outstretched arm to help us up.”—Simon Sinek, author of Start with Why and Leaders Eat Last

“With a fresh perspective that marries research and humor, Brown offers compassion while delivering thought-provoking ideas about relationships—with others and with oneself.”—Publishers Weekly

2. The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing

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Written by: Marie Kondo

Marie Kondo transforms a seemingly mundane topic into a philosophy that will help you get your life under control. Principles of folding and organizing your clothes apparently can be applied to many life decisions. The most organized woman in the world (according to Pureview), Condo lays down some rules that will help you combat the clutter of a modern home in our privileged society, full of excesses.

Reviews:

“Ms. Kondo delivers her tidy manifesto like a kind of Zen nanny, both hortatory and animistic.” — The New York Times

“. . . a literal how-to-heave-ho, and I recommend it for anyone who struggles with the material excess of living in a privileged society. (Thanks to Ms. Kondo, I kiss my old socks goodbye.) … To show you how serious my respect for Ms. Kondo is: if I ever get a tattoo, it will say, Spark Joy!” — Jamie Lee Curtis, TIME

“This book lives up to its title: it will change your life.” — B.J. Novak, People

“This book is a cult. A totally reasonable, scary cult that works, doesn’t kill people (a bonus), but does drastically change your life. In this case — for the better.” — Buzzfeed

1. What Color Is Your Parachute 2019: A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers

img source: karousell.com

Written by: Richard N. Bolles

Looking for a job can be, and often is, a very stressful period in everyone’s life. It can greatly affect our personality and cause us to feel lost. Richard N. Bolles tries, and largely succeeds in revealing some underlying principles that can help you demystify the whole process. The book has been in print since 1970 and has been revised each year, adding helpful bits of information. The revisions have helped it stay relevant despite being written 50 years ago. It is a veritable treasure trove of advice on how to find a job or change your career.

Reviews:

“One of the first job-hunting books on the market. It is still arguably the best. And it is indisputably the most popular.” -Fast Company

“Ideally, everyone should read What Color Is Your Parachute? in the tenth grade and again every year thereafter.” -Fortune

“What Color Is Your Parachute? is about job-hunting and career-changing, but it’s also about figuring out who you are as a person and what you want out of life.” -Time

“Parachute is still a top seller and it remains the go-to guide for everyone from midlife-crisis boomers looking to change their careers to college students looking to start one.” -New York Post

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